Malaysia-Animals: World's largest bee rediscovered, "dog bears" to the rescue, and more

Animals: World's largest bee rediscovered, "dog bears" to the rescue, and more


Plus: What do you call a group of otters?  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌    ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  
Illegal Bird Traders Arrested
In this edition: Meet the "sea worm," filmed in incredible detail off the coast of New Zealand; learn about the world's largest bee, catalogued by an entomologist who was presumed dead; and read about "bear dogs," which are helping keep humans safe.
      Comeback Bug     
World's largest bee, once presumed extinct, filmed alive in the wild
Wallace's giant bee disappeared for more than a century. Now it's back, and already has been sold on eBay—raising fears about its continued survival.
See The Bee
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      Dog friends     
These dogs scare bears away—to protect them
Russian bear dogs are a new, non-lethal tool for wildlife agencies worried about ursine visitors getting too close to humans.
Meet the dogs
      Life Begins     
See a salamander grow from a single cell
A filmmaker has captured mesmerizing and intimate details of an alpine newt's first days, from a single cell to a tadpole.
Learn More
      Sea Squirt     
See the giant 'sea worm' filmed off the coast of New Zealand
Sea squirt. Fire body. Cockroach of the sea. These bizarre, glowing creatures can measure 26 feet or longer. Oddly, they are not one organism, but many.
Watch the Worm
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      species stories     
Bramble Cay melomys
The Bramble Cay melomys (Melomys rubicola), a rodent that lived on a small island north of Australia, has officially been declared extinct due to rising sea levels linked with climate change. Melomys is a group of rodents found in Australia; rubicola comes from the Latin rubus, meaning "bramble," and incola, meaning "resident."
Read On
DID YOU KNOW?
A group of swimming otters is called a "raft."

The term can also mean "a dense flock of floating ducks, or of other aquatic birds or mammals."
Oxford English Dictionary
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